“Creating Listening Environments  for the Hard of Hearing”

Advanced Listening 2016 | Copyright © All rights reserved |

About Assistive Listening Technologies

The hearing loop uses the built-in receiver in the hearing aid (T-coil) to transmit the sound without background noise through the personally adjusted hearing aid. Without any extra receiver and without any power consumption, the hearing aid user can experience crystal clear sound free of disturbing noise …read more

Induction Loop System


Loop Page

The three most widely used assistive listening systems are: Induction Loop, Infrared and FM Systems

All three listening system technologies have their uses, but it is important to understand their pros and cons before selecting the system that is right for your needs.


Infrared System


Infrared (or IR) Systems use infrared light to send an audio signal from a transmitter to a receiver. They rely on the same frequency of light that your remote control uses to control your TV.

PROS:

•  IR systems can cover a relatively large area.

•  They are generally straightforward to install, even after the construction of a room has been competed.

•  As IR systems use light for signal transmission, the signal will not leak out of a closed room. This allows for a secure transmission.

•  Even those without hearing aids can wear a receiver/ headset and reap the benefits.

CONS:

•    Infrared systems require the use of special receivers and headsets; they are not directly compatible with hearing aids

•    Infrared systems require a direct line of sight from the transmitter to the receiver, and in larger rooms, multiple transmitters are needed in order to adequately cover the area.


•   Receiver units need to be recharged regularly, and headsets must be kept hygienic.

•   The receiver must be tuned to the same frequency as the transmitter.


Morbi et

FM System


FM (Frequency Modulated) systems Radio waves to send an audio signal from a transmitter to a receiver. They rely on the same technology as your favorite radio station uses to transmit over a large area.

PROS:

•   FM Radio waves travel over a large area and through walls, so reception is generally very good.

•   The location of the transmitter and antenna are not very important so installation is generally easy, even after the construction of a room has been competed.

•  Even those without hearing aids can wear a receiver/ headset and reap the benefits.

CONS:

•    FM systems can suffer interference from other FM sources.

•   Because FM travels over large distances and through walls, unless one uses very expensive encrypted hardware, it is not a secure signal.

•    FM systems require a different frequency for each facility meaning a receiver (headset) must be tuned to the proper frequency at each location. This can be a very complicated process.

•    In using a headset it is obvious that a person has a hearing disability.  Many people are uncomfortable with others knowing about their disability and would prefer to simply not use the system at all.

•    Sound leakage from out of the headset and disturb other people.

•    FM systems require the use of special receivers and headsets; they are not directly compatible with hearing aids.

EVEN IF A FACILITY HAS A FM OR INFRARED SYSTEM ALREADY INSTALLED, THEY SHOULD STILL INSTALL A LOOP SYSTEM!